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Steve #3


Composite_of_Messier_42.jpg

10 files, last one added on Feb 25, 2011

 

1 albums on 1 page(s)

Random files - Mr. X's Gallery
NGC_1499_California_Nebula.jpg
NGC 14991053 viewsNGC 1499, aka the California Nebula, is a diffuse nebula found in the constellation Perseus. The nebula, which is composed primarily of hydrogen gas, was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1884 using a 6-inch refractor. The image is a total exposure of 3 hours 5 min (37 x 300 sec lights) using a Takahashi E-180 astrograph and a Canon 20Da DSLR at ISO 800 (30 darks, 67 flats). Image processed using Images Plus 3.82b and Adobe Photoshop CS5.
The_Zeta-Orionis_Region.jpg
The Zeta Orionis Region1306 viewsImage of the Zeta Orionis Region in the constellation Orion, which contains both the horsehead and flame nebula. This is a visible light image taken with a modified Canon 40D and a Takahashi Epsilon 180 f/2.8 astrograph (3hr 15 min total exposure). It is interesting to compare it to Jim's Narrowband Image (6th previous image) of the area which essentially maps the concentration of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur.
Composite_of_Messier_42.jpg
The Great Nebula in Orion1707 viewsMessier 42 in the constellation Orion is a star forming region in our galaxy, the Milky Way. It is a difficult object to photograph because of it's large variation in brightness. The attached is an image of M42 that is a combination of multiple stacked 10 second, 30 second, 60 second, 150 second, and 300 second exposures using Photoshop's High Dynamic Range tool ( Canon 20Da DSLR and an Astro-Physics 130mm f/8 refractor).
IC_417_and_NGC_1931.jpg
The Spider and the Fly1364 viewsIC 417, aka the spider, located in the constellation Auriga is the bright emission nebula in the center of the image. The smaller emission and reflection nebula NGC 1931, aka the fly, is located to the right. In the upper left-hand corner is the emission nebula IC 410. Exposure was a total of 3 hr 10 min (38 X 5 min) with a Takahashi E-180 and modified Canon 40D @ ISO 800 (30 darks, 60 flats). Image aquisition with Images Plus 4.0; Calibration, alignment, and stacking in Images Plus 3.82b.
NGC_2264.jpg
Open Cluster NGC 2264, the Cone and Fox Fur Nebula1647 viewsNGC 2264 in the Constellation Monoceros is an open cluster known as the Christmas Tree Cluster (middle and upside down). The Cone Nebula (bottom) and Fox Fur Nebula (just above and to the right of the blue reflection nebulosity) are included in the image. Total of 3 hoursrs 45 minutes exposure (modified Canon 40D, Takahashi Epsilon 180 astrograph, Images Plus 4.0, and Photoshop CS5).
M95_M96_M105.jpg
Galaxies in Leo1703 viewsMany bright and faint galaxies can be found in the Constellation Leo. The bright galaxy on the upper left is Messier 95; on the upper right is Messier 96; and in the lower right is Messier 105; next to M 105 is NGC 3389 and NGC 3371 (from top to bottom). Equipment: Takahashi E-180 f/2.8 astrograph, modified Canon 40D, Exposure 28 x 5 minute light frames, Images Plus and Adobe Photoshop CS5.
IC_2177_and_the__van_den_Bergh_93_reflection_nebulosity.jpg
IC 2177 emission and the van den Bergh 93 reflection nebulosity1562 viewsIC 2177, in the constellation Monoceros, is the large red emission nebula. IC 2177 is often called the Seagull Nebula, embedded in the head of the seagull is van den Bergh 93 (slightly left of center in the image) that actually refers only to the blue reflection nebulosity. Image is a total exposure of 2 hrs 30 mins (30 darks; 60 flats; modified Canon 40D; Takahashi E-180; image aquisition Images Plus 4.0; Calibration, alignment, and stacking in Images Plus 3.82b; Adobe Photoshop CS5)
gamma-Cygni_Region.jpg
The gamma-Cygni Region1028 viewsThe area around gamma-Cygni (in the constellation Cygnus) is surrounded by a large nebulous region collectively known as IC 1318. The brightest star in the image, gamma-Cygni or Sadr, is a foreground star and is not part of the nebula. Due to the dark lane dividing the nebula, it is sometimes referred to as the Butterfly Nebula. The image is a total exposure of 1 hr 15 min (15 x 5 min lights, 30 x 5 min darks, 64 flats; Takahashi E- 180, Canon 20Da, Paramount).

Last additions - Mr. X's Gallery
Composite_of_Messier_42.jpg
The Great Nebula in Orion1707 viewsMessier 42 in the constellation Orion is a star forming region in our galaxy, the Milky Way. It is a difficult object to photograph because of it's large variation in brightness. The attached is an image of M42 that is a combination of multiple stacked 10 second, 30 second, 60 second, 150 second, and 300 second exposures using Photoshop's High Dynamic Range tool ( Canon 20Da DSLR and an Astro-Physics 130mm f/8 refractor).Feb 25, 2011
M95_M96_M105.jpg
Galaxies in Leo1703 viewsMany bright and faint galaxies can be found in the Constellation Leo. The bright galaxy on the upper left is Messier 95; on the upper right is Messier 96; and in the lower right is Messier 105; next to M 105 is NGC 3389 and NGC 3371 (from top to bottom). Equipment: Takahashi E-180 f/2.8 astrograph, modified Canon 40D, Exposure 28 x 5 minute light frames, Images Plus and Adobe Photoshop CS5.Feb 24, 2011
NGC_2264.jpg
Open Cluster NGC 2264, the Cone and Fox Fur Nebula1647 viewsNGC 2264 in the Constellation Monoceros is an open cluster known as the Christmas Tree Cluster (middle and upside down). The Cone Nebula (bottom) and Fox Fur Nebula (just above and to the right of the blue reflection nebulosity) are included in the image. Total of 3 hoursrs 45 minutes exposure (modified Canon 40D, Takahashi Epsilon 180 astrograph, Images Plus 4.0, and Photoshop CS5).Jan 29, 2011
IC_2177_and_the__van_den_Bergh_93_reflection_nebulosity.jpg
IC 2177 emission and the van den Bergh 93 reflection nebulosity1562 viewsIC 2177, in the constellation Monoceros, is the large red emission nebula. IC 2177 is often called the Seagull Nebula, embedded in the head of the seagull is van den Bergh 93 (slightly left of center in the image) that actually refers only to the blue reflection nebulosity. Image is a total exposure of 2 hrs 30 mins (30 darks; 60 flats; modified Canon 40D; Takahashi E-180; image aquisition Images Plus 4.0; Calibration, alignment, and stacking in Images Plus 3.82b; Adobe Photoshop CS5)Jan 18, 2011
IC_417_and_NGC_1931.jpg
The Spider and the Fly1364 viewsIC 417, aka the spider, located in the constellation Auriga is the bright emission nebula in the center of the image. The smaller emission and reflection nebula NGC 1931, aka the fly, is located to the right. In the upper left-hand corner is the emission nebula IC 410. Exposure was a total of 3 hr 10 min (38 X 5 min) with a Takahashi E-180 and modified Canon 40D @ ISO 800 (30 darks, 60 flats). Image aquisition with Images Plus 4.0; Calibration, alignment, and stacking in Images Plus 3.82b.Jan 18, 2011
The_Zeta-Orionis_Region.jpg
The Zeta Orionis Region1306 viewsImage of the Zeta Orionis Region in the constellation Orion, which contains both the horsehead and flame nebula. This is a visible light image taken with a modified Canon 40D and a Takahashi Epsilon 180 f/2.8 astrograph (3hr 15 min total exposure). It is interesting to compare it to Jim's Narrowband Image (6th previous image) of the area which essentially maps the concentration of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur.Jan 06, 2011
Lunar_Eclipse_0117_am.jpg
Lunar Eclipse1073 viewsImage of the Lunar eclipse on Dec 21, 2010 at 1:17 AM from Mayhill, NM. Although the Moon is in the Earth's full shadow, or umbra, the moon appears to be have a copper-colored glow. This coloration is due to light bent (refraction) or scattered by the Earth's atmosphere onto the Moon. Image is a 6-second exposure with a Canon 40D at ISO 200 through a 130 mm f/9 Astro-Physics refractor on a Paramount.Dec 21, 2010
Moon.jpg
The Moon1227 viewsThe Moon, our nearest neighbor, provides a wealth of detail even in small telescopes. Indeed, as Garrett Serviss wrote regarding the distance to the moon in his book "Other Worlds" in 1901: "In consequence, of course, of its nearness, the moon is the only member of the planetary (solar) system whose principal features are visible to the naked eye." Image taken with a Astro-Physics 130 mm f/8 refractor and a Canon 20Da DSLR (11 X 1/250 second exposures at ISO 200; aligned and combined in Images Plus).Dec 15, 2010