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M8_M20_M21_in_Sagittarius_(PixInsight).jpg
Messier 8, 20, and 211027 viewsThe Messier objects M8 (large nebula on right), M20 (blue and red nebula upper left) and M21 (open cluster below and to the left of M20) are favorite summer objects in the constellation Sagittarius. The Messier objects are found in a dense star field of our own Milky Way galaxy. Image taken with a modified Canon 40D and Takahashi E-180ed astrograph on a Paramount (50 x 5 min lights; 30 darks, 64 flats).
The_Flaming_Star_Nebula.jpg
The Flaming Star Nebula1161 viewsThe Flaming Star Nebula, IC 405, is located in the Constellation Auriga. The nebula is illuminated by the variable star AE Aurigae that is slowly passing thru the nebula but in fact did not condense from the surrounding nebula. The image acquired with a Canon 20Da DSLR (ISO 800) and a Takahashi E 180 astrograph. Total exposure time of 2.5 hrs (30 X 300 seconds lights calibrated, aligned, stacked, and stretched (DDP) in Images Plus 3.80 and further processed in Adobe Photoshop CS4).
Lynds_Dark_Nebula_673_in_the_Constellation_Aquila~2.jpg
Lynds Dark Nebula 6732156 viewsLynds Dark Nebula 673 is found in the constellation Aquila. Unlike bright emission or reflection nebula, dark nebulae are essentially a dense cloud of gas and dust particles that block the light of stars behind it from our view. In this case, the light of stars in our Milky Way galaxy is blocked from view. Stars that do shine through often appear red due to the scattering of light by the dust particles. Total exposure of the image is 3.5 hrs (42 x 5 min).
IC_2177_and_the__van_den_Bergh_93_reflection_nebulosity.jpg
IC 2177 emission and the van den Bergh 93 reflection nebulosity1525 viewsIC 2177, in the constellation Monoceros, is the large red emission nebula. IC 2177 is often called the Seagull Nebula, embedded in the head of the seagull is van den Bergh 93 (slightly left of center in the image) that actually refers only to the blue reflection nebulosity. Image is a total exposure of 2 hrs 30 mins (30 darks; 60 flats; modified Canon 40D; Takahashi E-180; image aquisition Images Plus 4.0; Calibration, alignment, and stacking in Images Plus 3.82b; Adobe Photoshop CS5)
Messier_15.jpg
Messier 15947 viewsThe globular cluster Messier 15 is found in the constellation Pegasus. Globular clusters are large typically spherical clusters of stars gavitationally bond together. Current estimates suggest M15 contains at least 450,000 solar masses with a very dense center. Image taken with a 178 mm f/9 Astro-Physics refractor and a modified Canon 50D DSLR on an Astro-Physics 1200 mount (70 x 60 sec lights; 30 darks; 66 flats; Images Plus and Adobe Photoshop CS5 software).
Galaxies_in_the_Constellations_Virgo_and_Coma_Berenices.jpg
Galaxies in Virgo and Coma Berenices1224 viewsMany galaxies are seen in the constellations Virgo and Coma Berenices. To the bottom left is seen the spiral galaxy Messier 88, in which young stars and active star formation are present. In the lower right corner is seen the elliptical galaxy Messier 87, whose golden brown coloration is suggestive of old stars and little if any star formation. In the upper right hand quadrant is a pair of galaxies, NGC 4438 and 4435, aka the Eyes or Arp 120. Exposure is a total of 13 hr 35 min (163 X 5 min).
Flame_Nebula.JPG
The Flame Nebula868 viewsThe flame nebula, also known as NGC 2024, is found in the constellation Orion. NGC 2024 is a H-II region containing a vast cloud of dust, and is part of the Orion B Molecular Cloud Complex. A cluster of young stars is hidden by the dark dust lane. Image taken with an Astro-Physics 130 mm f8 refractor and SBIG ST2000xcm camera on an AP1200 mount: Total exposure 6 hr 40 min (80 x 5 min lights; 30 darks; 64 flats; 64 flat darks; 64 bias).
NGC_2175_Monkey_Head_Nebula.jpg
The Monkey Head Nebula765 viewsNGC 2175, aka the Monkey Head Nebula, is found in the constellation Orion. NGC 2175 is part of Sharpless 2-252, which is an extended H-II region that is approximately 7200 light years away. Please note that there is some discrepancy in the literature as to the designation as NGC 2175 or NGC 2174...for a discussion see S. J. O'Meara in Deep-Sky Companions: Hidden Treasures: Cambridge 2007. Image was taken with a Takahashi Epsilon 180 f/2.8 astrograph and a SBIG STF8300c camera on a Paramount. The exposure was a total of 14 hours 30 min exposure taken on 12/26, 12/27, 12/30 2012 and 1/1, 1/2 2013 (87 x 10 min lights, guided; 20 darks; 64 bias; 61 flats; all at -20 degress C). Images were graded in Images Plus 5.0 and calibrated, registered, integrated, and processed in PixInsight 1.8.1 Ripley.
2015_11_13_90mmSMII_41AU02_noLR_Ha_small.jpg
Massive Filament on the Sun594 viewsA dark filament of magnetism in the sun's southern hemisphere has curled upon itself to form a circle of gargantuan proportions. The circumference of the ring is almost a million kilometers (600,000 miles)! Magnetic filaments are very often unstable, and have a tendency to collapse. Filaments crashing to the surface of the sun can cause of a type of explosion called a Hyder flare. Any flare from this filament could be extra-energetic as it releases the tension stored in its million-km coil. Image taken from Alamogordo, NM on 11/13/15 at 10:14 AM MST (1714 UTC) using a Meade Instruments Coronado 90mm SolarMax II telescope and Imaging Source 41AU02 camera.
M1finalJPEG.jpg
The Crab Nebula in Oxygen[III] and Hydrogen-alpha Emission 715 viewsMessier 1, the Crab Nebula, is a supernova remnant found in the constellation Taurus. M1 was discovered by John Bevis in 1731 (independently discovered by Charles Messier in 1758). Admiral Smyth describes M1 as a “large nebula, pearly white” and of “oval form” in his Cycle of Celestial Objects (2nd edition, page 145). This bi-color image is a total of 17 hrs 20 min exposure using a Takahashi CCA-250 f/5 astrograph and a QSI683wsg CCD camera (Astrodon Gen 2 filters; H-alpha 5 nm; O[III] 3 nm) on a Paramount ME (26 x 1200 sec O[III] lights, 26 x 1200 sec H-alpha lights; 21 darks, 126 bias, and corresponding flats and flat darks). Color assignment H-alpha = red; 15:83 H-alpha:O[III] = green; O[III] = blue; processed in PixInsight 1.8.4.1195.
NGC_6882_NGC_6885.jpg
Open Clusters in Vulpecula691 viewsNGC 6882 /NGC 6885 are open clusters in the constellation Vulpecula, although there is considerable discussion in the literature as to whether one is superimposed on the other, are separate clusters, or if they where accidentally duplicated in the original 1784 observation. The bright foreground star, 20 Vulpeculae, does not belong to the cluster. The image taken with a 12.5” RCOS f/9 astrograph and a SBIG STF8300c camera on a Paramount ME on Oct 2, 2016 in Mayhill, NM (5 x 1200 sec lights @ -15 degrees C; 18 darks; 128 bias; 128 flats). Calibrated, registered, integrated, and processed in PixInsight 1.8.4.1195 Ripley (x64).
 
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